Body Lovin’ Tips

The new year is a perfect time to evaluate what served you in the previous one and plan your attack for the one to come. However, before you get bogged down with ‘new year, new you’ messaging from just about every business on the planet, we’d like to set something straight. There is nothing wrong with who you currently are. We love that person, that person is perfect as they are, and our ‘new year’ wish for you is that you will embrace them too. In contrast to all those newsletters, TV segments, newspaper articles and social media posts, we’re here to tell you that you do not need to join a gym, lose weight, start eating ‘clean’, or sign your life away to be able to face the new year...

This is a question that I get asked often and the answer is: it didn’t happen overnight, it took a lot of time, energy and effort! It’s not an answer that everyone is receptive to hearing, after all, we are human beings and we love quick fixes! Wouldn’t it be a dream come true if we could all watch Embrace and magically become hardcore body lovers, throwing off our clothes running down the street naked declaring ‘I have embraced’? Fixing an issue that has lived with many of us for years and years, and for some, a lifetime requires a hearty and solid solution. Yes, it might require you to go deep, and yes there will be tears, but the great news is that a big change is possible and your journey...

In 2017 I kicked off a speaking tour in Australia for Business Chicks and had the great pleasure of presenting in a very sunny Perth! After my talk, a woman came up to me and said, “I inject women’s faces with Botox for a living, and I love what you are doing!”. We hugged and had a very cool conversation about how even though our opinions of cosmetic surgery are very, very different, we agreed that we can both still be part of this body image movement. It reminded me of my interview on The Doctors. When I was sat next to the cosmetic surgeon, I think the producers thought we might battle it out somehow, but of course, we didn’t. I acknowledged that surgery has made a lot of...

One of the most impactful actions I took, was tapping into having more gratitude for all the things my body could do. So many of us have gone down this road of hating our bodies, loathing our bodies, being so anchored down about how we feel about our bodies. It has become so consuming that we have become obsessed thinking about these bodies being less than perfect. If we look at what our bodies can do, not just how they look, we really should be very grateful. My legs can run, my arms can hug, my body completed a marathon. What my body looks like doesn’t define me. What does define me, is who I am as a person and how I contribute to the world. When I started considering my body,...

This question has come up quite a few times. I don’t know anyone –and have never met anyone– who has made a positive, meaningful, lifelong change that came from fear or shame. If we really want to help people make better choices around their health and wellbeing, we need to help them embrace. We need to encourage one another to have self-respect and self-love, and we need to promote self-care. It is evident that people who embrace their bodies and feel good about themselves make better and healthier choices. Exercising should not be a punishment Exercising and moving your body is pleasurable. There’s no good or bad food, food is just food, and I think we need to respect and love our bodies and make choices that fuel us well and give us...

What parents need to understand, is that we are kings and queens in the minds of our children. They look up to us and we have to model positive behaviour when it comes to our bodies and the relationships we have with our bodies. I’ve had many discussions over the years with mums in particular whose child has developed a dissatisfaction for their body and how it looks, and the conversations I have with that particular mum is that they have exercised their bodies and dieted as a form of punishment, not pleasure. Our kids hear and see everything, and in our homes, we need to promote a safe space for them to flourish. Remove scales; don’t allow that square box to determine your worth. In terms of older kids and social...

We asked 100 people from the ages of 1-100 what one word they use to describe their body. The answers we received were similar among people of the same age but differed immensely between generations. Firstly, we had a chat with the youngest generation. We spoke to some toddlers, kids, and teens and the one word they use to describe their bodies were very happy and positive: fast, flexible, sensitive, colourful, energetic, agile, talented, powerful, capable, lovable, balanced, excellent, unique, and healthy. Next up, we asked older teens and young adults, and even though they came from all different walks of life, their answers were all equally negative. Their replies broke our hearts: lanky, “just okay”, podgy, confused, average, dissatisfied, neglected, dense and curvy, disobedient, and “it is what it is”. Then we asked adults how...

I would say the answer to this question is a resounding YES. Yes, for two fundamental reasons. The first is to ensure that as a parent you engender a healthy body image in your children. The second is because as a society we need to stop the fat shaming and discrimination that is pervasive in the Western world. Let me talk about the first point. As we all know, parents are role models for their children. This is both amazingly powerful and downright terrifying in equal measure. We can have a strong desire for our children to embrace their bodies and have a healthy sense of self, but is this possible if we, as parents, do not hold the same values for our own body? Can we expect our children to...

Well the first thing I need to say is WOW. Over 2.6million people viewed the post and over 14000 people felt it was worth sharing with their friends. Over 2300 people have taken the time to give their personal opinion on the post in the comments section, and it is to this that I would like to turn my attention. Click the link below to see the post via Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?fbid=314574818670200&set=a.209208695873480.46106.207017289425954&type=1&theater The majority of comments indicated that people found the post to be not only powerful but empowering as well. Many women (and men) expressed appreciation for the post in highlighting the importance to them of learning self acceptance. As one of the main aims of the Body Image Movement is to communicate the message of accepting and loving our body, this has...