Life Hacks & Inspo

The new year is a perfect time to evaluate what served you in the previous one and plan your attack for the one to come. However, before you get bogged down with ‘new year, new you’ messaging from just about every business on the planet, we’d like to set something straight. There is nothing wrong with who you currently are. We love that person, that person is perfect as they are, and our ‘new year’ wish for you is that you will embrace them too. In contrast to all those newsletters, TV segments, newspaper articles and social media posts, we’re here to tell you that you do not need to join a gym, lose weight, start eating ‘clean’, or sign your life away to be able to face the new year...

Well, hello! As I write this I am currently sitting at The Bondi Skate Park in Sydney watching my 10-year-old, Oliver do tricks on his scooter while I put together this little update for you. I’m not usually down with doing two things at once, especially when it comes to my children. I like to stay present and enjoy time with them, but the current trip I’m on in Sydney is a work trip—so ‘Mr 10-year-old’ Oliver has to work with me on this occasion. I have to say the view isn’t too shabby and there is nothing I love more than being out in fresh air with a few rays of sun falling down on me…it’s bliss. The past few years has been quite a big juggle for me, trying to...

One of the most impactful actions I took, was tapping into having more gratitude for all the things my body could do. So many of us have gone down this road of hating our bodies, loathing our bodies, being so anchored down about how we feel about our bodies. It has become so consuming that we have become obsessed thinking about these bodies being less than perfect. If we look at what our bodies can do, not just how they look, we really should be very grateful. My legs can run, my arms can hug, my body completed a marathon. What my body looks like doesn’t define me. What does define me, is who I am as a person and how I contribute to the world. When I started considering my body,...

This question has come up quite a few times. I don’t know anyone –and have never met anyone– who has made a positive, meaningful, lifelong change that came from fear or shame. If we really want to help people make better choices around their health and wellbeing, we need to help them embrace. We need to encourage one another to have self-respect and self-love, and we need to promote self-care. It is evident that people who embrace their bodies and feel good about themselves make better and healthier choices. Exercising should not be a punishment Exercising and moving your body is pleasurable. There’s no good or bad food, food is just food, and I think we need to respect and love our bodies and make choices that fuel us well and give us...

What parents need to understand, is that we are kings and queens in the minds of our children. They look up to us and we have to model positive behaviour when it comes to our bodies and the relationships we have with our bodies. I’ve had many discussions over the years with mums in particular whose child has developed a dissatisfaction for their body and how it looks, and the conversations I have with that particular mum is that they have exercised their bodies and dieted as a form of punishment, not pleasure. Our kids hear and see everything, and in our homes, we need to promote a safe space for them to flourish. Remove scales; don’t allow that square box to determine your worth. In terms of older kids and social...

What Age Can I Bring My Kids to see Embrace? This is a question that has been coming up quite a bit. There are some themes in Embrace that parents might see as unsuitable for their children. We fully appreciate that every child is unique and what might be appropriate for one child is not appropriate for another. With that in mind, I have outlined below the areas in Embrace that were mentioned in the New Zealand Office of Film and Literature Classification’s report when giving the film an unrestricted M (mature) rating. Accompanied, are their reasonings of why these segments are justified within the overall context of the film. The film includes: A reasonable amount of non-sexual nudity This includes brief depictions of women’s breasts, buttocks and genital nudity in medical and natural...